Michigan Attorney General Resumes Threats Of Criminal Prosecution Against Those Alleging Voter Fraud

We have been discussing the use of the criminal code by Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel (D) to threaten people who post videos on alleged voter fraud or legislators who raise such objections in the state. These threats are coercive and abusive, particularly when targeting opponents of your party who are challenging the victory of your candidate for president. Yet, as shown by a congressman seeking to disbar dozens of Trump lawyers, such threats are popular in today’s rage-filled politics.  So, Nessel continued her threats of prosecution on Monday in warning that a former state senator could be prosecuted for alleging possible voter fraud at a meeting of the Michigan Board of State Canvassers.  So, raising voting fraud at the board overseeing voting is now a possible basis for prosecution in Michigan.

Former state Sen. Patrick Colbeck (R) raised his concerns during the meeting. He was appropriately asked if he had brought his allegations of voter fraud to the state attorney general.  Julie Matuzak (D) asked “If you’re alleging fraud in this election, have you taken it to the attorney general, your evidence?” She noted that the board has little ability to investigate such claims. Colbeck responded “I’ve submitted my affidavits to lawyers, and we’ve moved it up the chain that way. I can submit it to anybody you’d like me to submit it to.”

Of course, many Republicans in the state may be a tad reluctant to reach out to Nessel given her threats of prosecution against citizens and legislators alike.

As if to fulfill that view, Nessel immediately responded with yet another threat of prosecution.  She noted that Colbeck “has never made a complaint of election fraud” to her office and then added “Colbeck’s assertions aside, intentionally making a false claim of criminal activity to law enforcement is itself a crime. It’s been my experience that is often the reason certain reports are not made.”