TEXAS inmate Quintin Jones was executed by lethal injection on Wednesday evening. He was 41.

The death row inmate was convicted of killing his great-aunt in 1999 when he was 20-years-old.

He beat his great-aunt Berthena Bryant, 83, to death and stole $30 to pay for drugs. He admitted to the crimes, and his family forgave him.

Jones’ great-aunt Mattie Long – the victim’s sister – asked for his life to be spared.

“I love him very much,” she told CBS News

More than 170,000 people signed a Change.org petition asking Abbott to grant Jones clemency. He did not.

The Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles denied Jones’ petition for clemency, despite having granted it in a similar case three years ago for a white man.

Jones’ lawyer filed a complaint that the parole board may have denied Jones clemency due to his race, but that complaint was dismissed.

The Supreme Court also denied an appeal from Jones, mere hours before he was put to death.

  • JONES GREAT AUNT – SISTER TO THE VICTIM – FORGIVES HIM

    Jones’ great aunt and his victim’s sister, Mattie Long, said she has forgiven him for the murder of her sibling.

    “I love him very much,” she told CBS News as she pleaded for clemency.

    Long said she and Bryant were extremely close and she misses her sister dearly. However, she does not believe Jones should die.

    “I think the governor should spare him because he has changed and he’s a different person than he used to be,” Long said.

    “He had an unimaginably difficult childhood of abuse and violence and addiction and neglect, but as he said to me, his childhood did not excuse what he did.”

  • JONES’ LAWYER MISSED FILING DEADLINES TO APPEAL DEATH SENTENCE

    Jones lost his federal appeal in 2009 because his attorney failed to submit the paperwork on time, essentially forfeiting Jones’ last constitutionally required opportunity to have his sentence reviewed.

    Jones said he spent months trying to alert the courts of his problems with his state-appointed attorney before he missed the federal deadline.

    According to the Houston Chronicle, Jones wrote to the judge, filed two motions to try to get another attorney, and sent complaints to the state bar.

    “I heard he didn’t file (on time) through another lawyer,” Jones said. “I’m the one who pays for his mistake. It cost a lot, and I’m paying for it.”

  • SUPPORT FOR THE DEATH PENALTY IS DECLINING

    Recent polls have found that support for the death penalty is declining.

    A 2019 Gallup poll found that only 36% of Americans chose the death penalty when asked whether the death penalty or life without the possibility of parole “is the better penalty for murder.”

    There is also are growing number of innocent people that have died by the death penalty and been exonerated posthumously.

    The Equal Justice Initiative found that for every nine people executed, one of them was later found innocent and exonerated.

  • JONES’ PLEA FOR CLEMENCY FELL ON THE DEAF EARS OF THE TEXAS GOVERNOR

    In a four-minute video published in the opinion section of the New York Times, the death row prisoner stared into the camera from behind bullet-proof glass and asked for clemency from Texas Gov. Greg Abbott.

    “I know you don’t know me. I’m writing this letter to ask you if you could find it in your heart to grant me clemency, so I don’t get executed on 19 May. I got two weeks to live, starting today,” Jones said.

    Texas leads the nation in executions each year, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

    Five of the six people expected to be put to death in 2021 are in Texas.

    Jones was executed Wednesday evening.

  • WHO WAS QUINTIN JONES?

    Jones, 41, was executed last night in Texas. His was the first execution the state had seen in ten months and the first of 2021.

    Jones was arrested in 1999 for beating his great-aunt Berthena Bryant, 83, to death and stealing $30 to pay for drugs. He used a baseball bat she used for her own protection.

    In an interview, Jones admitted to his crimes and said he had changed while in prison.

    His great-aunt Mattie Long – the victim’s sister – said she had forgiven Jones. She pled for clemency for him.

    “I love him very much,” she told CBS News

  • TOUCHING TRIBUTE PLAYED FOR QUINTIN JONES

    In his final moments, Quintin Jones made a call to journalist Suleika Jaouad.

    Jaouad had Jones on speaker phone while her partner, Jon Batiste, played Johnny Cash’s “I’ll Fly Away” on the piano.

    After Batiste finished singing the song, Jones jokingly accused him of playing a “tape recorder,” not playing the song live.

  • QUINTIN JONES SAID IN HIS LAST WORDS THAT HE HOPES TO LEAVE HAPPY MEMORIES BEHIND

    Execution records show Jones was taken from his cell at 6.07pm CT. He gave his last statement at 6.27p.

    “Love all my friends and all the friendships that I have made,” Jones said. “They are like the sky. It is all part of life, like a big full plate of food for the soul.”

    No media were present for Jones’ execution, despite protocols that guarantee them a right to witness the event.

    “I hope I left everyone a plate of food full of happy memories, happiness, and no sadness. I’m done, warden,” he said right before the lethal dose was injected.

  • REPORTERS STRESS IMPORTANCE OF BEING PRESENT FOR EXECUTIONS

    Several reporters were stunned when there was no media present at Quintin Jones’ execution.

    “Having witnessed executions myself, I can’t overstate how important it is for the media to be a part of them,” the Texas Tribunes Jolie McCullough said.

    “Officials reports never tell the full picture of what happens when the state wields its greatest power over life,” she added. “This transparency is necessary.”

  • TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE WILL INVESTIGATE WHY MEDIA WAS NOT INCLUDED TO JONES EXECUTION

    “As a result of a miscommunication between officials at the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, there was never a call made to…summon the media witnesses into the unit,” communications director Jeremy Desel said.

    Reporters said this was likely the first execution in Texas without media witnesses.

    We apologize for this critical error,” Desel said. “The agency is investigating to determine exactly what occurred to ensure it does not happen again.”

  • TEXAS BLAMES NEW EXECUTION STAFF FOR LEAVING MEDIA OUT OF QUINTIN JONES EXECUTION

    While the Texas Department of Criminal Justice guarantees media representatives a right to be present for executions, media were not in the room when Quintin Jones was executed this evening.

    The TDCJ blamed the lapse on new staff.

    “We have a number of new personnel that are a part of the execution team who have not been a part of an execution in the past,” said TDCJ Director of Communications Jeremy Desel.

  • GOV ABBOTT SLAMMED FOR ‘PRO-LIFE’ TWEET HOURS BEFORE JONES WAS EXECUTED

    Critics slammed Texas Gov. Greg Abbott for tweeting about Texas being “pro-life” just hours before Quintin Jones was executed.

    Abbott favors policies that restrict and even criminalize abortion. Meanwhile, Texas leads the nation in executions.

  • ‘JUSTICE WAS NOT SERVED’ QUINTIN JONES’ PEN PAL SAYS

    Suleika Jaouad, the journalist who exchanged letters with Jones, spoke out about his execution last night.

    “Justice was not served,” Jaouad said in a tweet. “The world is not a better place because Quin is gone.”

    Jaouad and Jones started writing to each other in 2012 after Jones reached out to Jaouad about an essay she wrote that he found to be particularly moving.

    Jaouad was struggling with leukemia at the time and spent much of her time in isolation at the hospital. She called it her “incanceration.”

  • QUINTIN JONES’ LAST WORDS BEFORE EXECUTION

    Quintin Jones was executed by lethal injection Wednesday night. He was pronounced dead at 6.40pm CT.

    He used his last words to thank his friends and family.

    “I would like to thank all of the supporting people who helped me over the years,” Jones said while strapped to the gurney.

    “I was so glad to leave this world a better, more positive place. It’s not an easy life with all of the negativity,” he said.

  • NAACP PRESIDENT SPEAKS OUT AFTER QUINTIN JONES’ EXECUTION

    Derrick Johnson, the president of the NAACP, spoke out after Jones was executed.

    “Another Black man has been executed tonight,” Johnson said. “America’s outlook on justice remains broken, barbaric and in human.”

    The NAACP lobbied for clemency for Jones to no avail.

  • TOUCHING TRIBUTE PLAYED FOR QUINTIN JONES

    In his final moments, Quintin Jones made a call to journalist Suleika Jaouad.

    Jaouad had Jones on speaker phone while her partner, Jon Batiste, played Johnny Cash’s “I’ll Fly Away” on the piano.

    After Batiste finished singing the song, Jones jokingly accused him of playing a “tape recorder,” not playing the song live.

  • PEN PAL SAID QUINTON JONES CALLED HER ONE LAST TIME

    Suleika Jaouad, the journalist who frequently wrote to Jones, spoke out about his execution last night.

    “Before Quin entered the execution chamber he called me for the last time,” Jaouad said. “He was sad but so grateful that his story had touched those who didn’t even know they needed to be touched.”

    In his last moments, Jones hoped his story would leave a lasting impact, Jaouad said

    “He hoped people would pick up the pebble and throw it into the next pond, and let it ripple out,” Jaouad said. “Quin’s last words, to me, to all of us: ‘Keep doing the good work.'”

  • ‘JUSTICE WAS NOT SERVED’ QUINTIN JONES’ PEN PAL SAYS

    Suleika Jaouad, the journalist who exchanged letters with Jones, spoke out about his execution last night.

    “Justice was not served,” Jaouad said. “The world is not a better place because Quin is gone.”

    Jaouad and Jones started writing to each other in 2012 after Jones reached out to Jaouad about an essay she wrote that he found to be particularly moving.

    Jaouad was struggling with leukemia at the time and spent much of her time in isolation at the hospital. She called it her “incanceration.”

  • TEXAS BOARD OF PARDONS AND PAROLES RECOMMENDED NO CLEMENCY, ATTORNEY CLAIMED DISCRIMINATION

    On Tuesday, the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles recommended against clemency for Quintin Jones.

    In response, Jones’ lawyer filed a complaint alleging that the board made its decision based on race.

    Just three years ago, the parole board and the Texas governor spared the life of Thomas Whitaker, a white man who also faced the death penalty.

    “The lack of consistency in the application of grounds for clemency – where clemency was recommended and granted for Whitaker, who is white, and rejected for Mr. Jones, who is black – presents a legally cognizable claim that Mr. Jones’s race played an impermissible role in the Board’s denial of his application for clemency,” the filing by Jones’ lawyer read.

    Gov. Greg Abbott could have granted a 30-day reprieve for Jones, but he did not. Jones was executed Wednesday night with no media witnesses.

  • JONES LOST HIS FEDERAL APPEAL IN 2009 DUE TO LATE PAPERWORK

    Quintin Jones lost his federal appeal in 2009 because his attorney failed to submit the paperwork on time.

    “I heard he didn’t file (on time) through another lawyer,” Jones said. “I’m the one who pays for his mistake. It cost a lot, and I’m paying for it.”

    According to the Houston Chronicle, Jones wrote to the judge, filed two motions to try to get another attorney, and sent complaints to the state bar.

  • JONES PLED FOR CLEMENCY BUT NO ONE LISTENED

    In a four-minute video published in the opinion section of the New York Times, Quintin Jones stared into the camera and asked for clemency from Texas Gov. Greg Abbott.

    “I know you don’t know me. I’m writing this letter to ask you if you could find it in your heart to grant me clemency, so I don’t get executed on 19 May. I got two weeks to live, starting today,” Jones said.

    Texas leads the nation in executions each year, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

  • WHO WAS QUINTIN JONES?

    Jones, 41, was executed last night in Texas. His was the first execution the state had seen in ten months and the first of 2021.

    Jones was arrested in 1999 for beating his great-aunt Berthena Bryant, 83, to death and stealing $30 to pay for drugs. He used a baseball bat she used for her own protection.

    In an interview, Jones admitted to his crimes and said he had changed while in prison.

    His great-aunt Mattie Long – the victim’s sister – said she had forgiven Jones. She pled for clemency for him.

    “I love him very much,” she told CBS News

  • QUINTIN JONES SAID IN HIS LAST WORDS THAT HE HOPES TO LEAVE HAPPY MEMORIES BEHIND

    Execution records show Jones was taken from his cell at 6.07pm CT. He gave his last statement at 6.27p.

    “Love all my friends and all the friendships that I have made,” Jones said. “They are like the sky. It is all part of life, like a big full plate of food for the soul.”

    No media were present for Jones’ execution, despite protocols that guarantee them a right to witness the event.

    “I hope I left everyone a plate of food full of happy memories, happiness, and no sadness. I’m done, warden,” he said right before the lethal dose was injected.

  • MEDIA BLOCKED FROM QUINTIN JONES’ EXECUTION BECAUSE OF ‘MISCOMMUNICATION’

    Quintin Jones’ execution was the first in Texas in ten months. However, media witnesses were not present due to a “miscommunication” from the state.

    The Texas Department of Criminal Justice policy dictates that a member from the Associated Press and from the local Huntsville Item are guaranteed the ability to witness each execution performed.

    “The Texas Department of Criminal Justice can only apologize for this error and know nothing like this will ever happen again,” TDCJ Director of Communications Jeremy Desel said.

    The TDCJ blamed the lapse on new staff.

  • SUPREME COURT DENIED APPEAL FROM QUINTIN JONES

    On Wednesday night, hours before his execution, the Supreme Court denied an appeal from Quintin Jones.

    Jones previously sought clemency from the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles, which advised against clemency.

    In the Supreme Courts ruling, there were no dissents.

  • TEXAS BOARD OF PARDONS AND PAROLES RECOMMENDED NO CLEMENCY

    On Tuesday, the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles recommended against clemency for Quintin Jones.

    Gov. Greg Abbott could have granted a 30-day reprieve, but he did not. Jones was executed Wednesday night with no media witnesses.

    In his term as governor, Abbott has only granted clemency once before.