MOLLIE Tibbetts’ mobile phone, her Fitbit, and the “murder” weapon allegedly used to stab her to death have all never been found, the trial heard today.

Cristhian Bahena Rivera stands accused of killing the jogger with a “sharp object” believed to be a knife – but Special Agent Trent Vileta said the weapon has not been discovered.

“When asked about whether investigators were able to find a murder weapon in the death of #MollieTibbetts, Vileta says, ‘No we weren’t,'” a reporter noted of the case on Twitter.

While questioned in a cornfield, Rivera allegedly told Iowa officer Pamela Romero that he followed Tibbetts in his car, got out and started running behind her.

The 26-year-old told cops that Mollie Tibbetts “tried to slap him and was screaming at him,” a cop has testified.

Rivera said that Tibbetts noticed him and tried to use her cell phone to call police.

“He said that Mollie tried to slap him and was screaming at him,” Romero testified. “Mr Rivera said this is when he became angry.”

Blood found in the suspect’s Chevy Malibu trunk “was a first match” for the slain student a forensics expert testified last week.

Tara Scott, a criminalist in the DNA section of Iowa’s crime lab, said she analyzed a swab taken from a blood stain found on the trunk seal after investigators recovered Tibbetts’ body.

“The profile I had from Mollie Tibbetts and the profile from that blood matched,” Scott testified. “They were exactly the same.”

Rivera, 26, has been charged with first-degree murder in Tibbetts’ stabbing death. He has pleaded not guilty.

Tibbetts, 20, vanished while out running on July 18, 2018, in Brooklyn, Iowa.

The interrogation tape was shown on the third day of the trial

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The interrogation tape was shown on the third day of the trialCredit: Court TV
Pictures showed bloodstains inside Rivera's trunk

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Pictures showed bloodstains inside Rivera’s trunkCredit: Court TV

Investigators recovered her partially naked, decomposing body from a cornfield a month later.

During the interrogation, Rivera led police to the cornfield where her body was found, telling them, “I brought you here, didn’t I? So that means that I did it.”

The defense, who presented the interrogation video as evidence, argued that Rivera appeared to be asleep during part of the questioning.

Pamela Romero, who interrogated Rivera, said on the witness stand that she was not aware Rivera was asleep, but a look at the interrogation transcript showed she had told the accused man, “You fell asleep.”

The trial continues.

  • WHO IS ON THE JURY?

    There are 12 white and three Hispanic jurors on the trial for Mollie Tibbetts’ murder. Eight are women and seven men, ranging in age from 19 to 74

    As Rivera’s trial got underway shortly after 9.30am local time, Judge Joel D Yates said the defendant was innocent until proven guilty after the intense media scrutiny and interest in the case.

    After the jury selection yesterday, Prosecutor Scott Brown warned they will be shown graphic photos and hear disturbing testimony about the jogger’s stabbing death.

    “We’re going to talk about the violent death of a young girl, Mollie Tibbetts,” said Brown. “It’s not going to be pleasant.”

  • TIBBETTS’ BLOOD FOUND ON RIVERA’S TRUCK

    Poweshiek County Attorney Bart Klaver said Tibbetts’ blood on the trunk liner of Rivera’s Chevy Malibu, and claimed he admitted to “jogging” to catch up with Mollie before they fought when she threatened to call the cops.

    “He says the next thing he remembers [is] he notices Mollie’s earbuds [in his car],” Klaver went on moments before the court’s audio cut out and the first witness took the stand. “He admits seeing blood on Mollie’s body and neck.”

    He said police later searched the field where they found a body later identified as Tibbetts “decomposed beyond recognition.”

    “[Rivera] described the body as [being like] someone who had fainted,” Klaver continued, alleging Rivera told cops he took Tibbett’s bloodied body from the trunk of his car and dumped it in the cornfield covered in stalks.

  • WAS IT AN INTERROGATION OR INTERVIEW

    Rivera’s Defense attorney Jennifer Frese asked former Iowa City Police Officer Pamela Romero if the 11-hour questioning session she conducted of Frese’s client, suspect Cristhian Rivera, was an interrogation.

    “Another thing is that he’s also being interrogated and you would agree with me that this was an interrogation correct,” Frese asked.

    “I do not agree with you on that,” Romero said.

    “Okay, well he was a suspect here is that right,” Frese countered.

    “I was not I did not make him aware that he was a suspect I did not have anything to hold him as a suspect at the time of the interview,” Romero responded.

  • DID CRISTHIAN BAHENA RIVERA ADMIT TO KILLING MOLLIE TIBBETTS?

    Cristhian Bahena Rivera is accused of fatally stabbing college student Mollie Tibbetts while she was out running in her hometown of Brooklyn, Iowa, in July of 2018.

    Rivera later confessed to approaching Tibbetts and killing her in a panic after she threatened to call police, according to detectives.

  • RIVERA ONCE BLASTED BY FORMER PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP

    Former President Donald Trump once criticized accused murderer Cristhian Bahena Rivera.

    The undocumented immigrant was blasted by Trump as a criminal who exploited lax immigration laws.

    He used Rivera as an example to push for harsher immigration policies ahead of the 2018 midterm elections.

  • WHEN DID MOLLIE TIBBETTS DISAPPEAR?

    Mollie Tibbetts went missing on July 28, 2018.

    Her disappearance sparked a massive search involving hundreds of law enforcement and volunteers.

    Sadly, her body was found about a month later on August 21.

    Police found a body later identified as Tibbetts “decomposed beyond recognition” in a cornfield.

  • TIBBETTS’ BOYFRIEND AND HIS BROTHER TRIED TO CONTACT HER

    Blake Jack, the brother of Tibbett’s boyfriend Dalton, said they tried contacting Tibbetts on her cellphone, on Facebook, and on Snapchat and said his brother, Dalton, got along well with girlfriend Tibbetts before Rivera’s Defense attorney Jennifer Frese questioned him.

    “Her friends that were with us [had Snapchat],” he told Frese, who noted it would be “pretty usual” that Tibbett’s friends would be able to see her using the app’s location data.

    Frese also asked him if he gave a DNA swab (he said no), if he took a polygraph, and quizzed Jack about his affinity for hunting deer with his brother, Dalton, as well as his knives and guns.

    The lawyer also asked Jack if his brother and Tibbetts had any issues, alleging his teen brother cheated on her with another woman and had “anger problems” and had fought in school.

    “Not that I’m aware of,” he said. “I’m sure he wouldn’t be the first 18-year-old to cheat on his girlfriend.”

    His younger brother, Dalton, 23, a sergeant in the 82nd Airborne Division stationed at Fort Bragg, then took the stand, confirming that he joined the US Army on November 6, 2018.

  • MOLLIE TIBBETTS OBITUARY

    Mollie Tibbett’s obituary was published in the Des Moines Register from August 24 to 29, 2018.

    It described the 20-year-old as a person who “loved life” before the avid jogger was brutally murdered and her body dumped in a cornfield on July 18 of that year.

    “Her passion for it radiated from those beautiful brown eyes and the smile that she was so quick to share with everyone she met,” it read. “She excelled in writing and speech where she shared her thoughts on some very difficult and complex subjects, mental health and self-esteem.

    “Her talents were rewarded when she was invited to perform them three years at the Iowa All State competition. From her first musical appearance, she was hooked on theatre and enjoyed acting in the school plays.

    “Mollie pushed herself in cross country and made running a part of her everyday life. Children are also something Mollie loved dearly. She began babysitting at an early age and worked the last two summers at the GRMC Day Camp where the kids adored her ability to make them laugh and the way she made them feel love.”

    The tribute also noted that she was attending the University of Iowa to become a child psychologist when her life was cut short.

    It added that she loved singing and making friends.

  • BLOOD ‘MATCHED TIBBETTS’ PROFILE’ – COURT TOLD

    Blood found in the trunk of a farmhand’s car was an exact match for a University of Iowa student who was abducted and killed while out for a run in 2018, a DNA analyst told jurors on Friday.

    Tara Scott, a criminalist in the DNA section of Iowas crime lab, said she analyzed a swab taken from a blood stain found on the trunk seal of Cristhian Bahena Riveras Chevy Malibu after investigators recovered the body of Mollie Tibbetts.

    “The profile I had from Mollie Tibbetts and the profile from that blood matched,” Scott testified. “They were exactly the same.”

  • JUDGE REMINDS TRIAL THAT CRISTHIAN BAHENA RIVERA IS INNOCENT UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY

    Cristhian Bahena Rivera’s trial for the murder of Mollie Tibbetts began Wednesday with opening arguments.

    The trial got underway shortly after 9.30AM local time, and Judge Joel D Yates said the defendant was innocent until proven guilty following the intense media scrutiny and interest in his case.

  • DEFENSE BRINGS UP OTHER SUSPECTS

    Defense Attorney Chad Frese brought up another suspect in the killing of Mollie Tibbetts at Rivera’s trial today.

    The other suspect is Darian Davis, who was mowing a lawn at a cemetary nearby where Tibbetts was taken.

    About targeting Rivera, Frese said, “Who better to pick than an undocumented immigrant who has no one to help him.”

  • DEFENSE CALLS OFFICER WHO INTERROGATED RIVERA ‘INEXPERIENCED’

    Officer Pamela Romero interrogated Rivera because they both spoke Spanish.

    It was here that Rivera gave a confession that was later challenged.

    Frese spoke out about the situation saying, “This case had the unlimited resources of the federal government. FBI, DCI, these guys are the ‘best of the best’ — and yet they bring in inexperienced officer Pamela Romero to conduct interrogation.

    “They sent the most inexperienced officer they could into a marathon officer they could for a suspect in a homicide case that had more attention than they have ever known … because she was a quote-unquote ‘native speaker.'”

    “If that evidence was with someone who’s an English speaker, that evidence would have been played. But since it’s in Spanish, you only get to hear bits and pieces from what Ms. Romero said. And you’re told to rely on that as a confession,” Frese said. “Folks, that’s a problem. That’s sloppy.”

  • DEFENSE CHALLENGES PROSECUTOR’S MOTIVE

    Defense Attorney Frese challenged the motive that Prosecutor Scott Brown argued for Rivera in killing Mollie Tibbetts.

    “This man, 5’7″ 125-pound illegal immigrant … is angry at Mollie Tibbetts who he never met before … and resorts to killing her, stabbing her nine times? Because he’s angry?”

    “The evidence we do have about Cristhian Bahena Rivera is that he’s not an angry man. He’s not violent, he’s hard-working. He came to his country for a reason and you can bet he wanted to stay in this country.”

  • DEFENSE ATTORNEY WARNS AGAINST DECIDING THE CASE WITH ‘EMOTIONS’

    Rivera’s Defense Attorney Chad Frese reiterated the tragedy of Mollie Tibbett’s death, but warned against deciding a case based on emotions.

    “This woman was a spectacular young woman. She was destined to do great things.

    “This young lady was on her way to being something special. No doubt about it. The loss of Mollie Tibbetts was tragic, and the reason I mention that, is because the loss of someone like that can evoke a lot of emotion, and it has evoked emotion.

    “You don’t decide this case with emotions tugging at your heartstrings,” he said.

  • PROSECUTOR DEMANDS MURDER IN THE FIRST DEGREE CHARGES

    Prosecutor Scott Brown’s closing arguments in Rivera’s trial for the murder of Mollie Tibbett are as follows:

    “Looking at everything we have, all of the circumstances, the truth here is overwhelming … the defendant murdered Mollie Tibbetts on July 18 of 2018.

    “Justice, in this case, ladies and gentleman, is a verdict of murder in the first degree.”

  • EVIDENCE ON RIVERA’S MALIBU

    There was blood found on Rivera’s Malibu that was confirmed to belong to Mollie Tibbetts.

    Regarding Rivera’s story that two men made him kill Tibbetts, Prosecutor Brown said that his Malibu was not involved in that story.

    Brown also mentioned that Rivera had time to clean his car after the crime was committed, meaning there could have been more blood to begin with.

  • BROWN IDENTIFIES A MOTIVE FOR RIVERA

    Prosecutor Scott Brown indentified a motive for Rivera during his trial for the death of Mollie Tibbetts.

    “She’s a cute 20-year-old woman. He likes her. She’s wearing tight clothing … as she was jogging down the road, that’s what got his attention,” he said.

    “If not the defendant, who had the motive to kill Mollie Tibbetts? Anger’s a pretty good one. Anger’s one of the oldest motives in history,” Brown said.

    “Why is he angry? She has rebuked him. Mollie had threatened to call the police. The way he reacts to that anger is to stab this woman to death and dump her body in a cornfield.”

  • WITNESS CONFIRMS DALTON JACK’S ALIBI

    Police already scratched the idea of Jack being a suspect after establishing he had an alibi while working out of town on the day she was suspected of being killed.

    Dalton’s supervisor at work, Nick Wilson, testified that Jack was in Davenport at the time of the crime.

  • PROSECUTOR SCOTT BROWN CLOSING ARGUMENTS

    Prosecutor Scott Brown reminded the jury of crucial evidence in the death of Mollie Tibbetts during Rivera’s trial on Thursday.

    “She was attacked brutally by him, stabbed repeatedly by him. Can you imagine what that was like for her?” Brown asked the jury.

    “The evidence in this case shows that the defendant, and only the defendant murdered Mollie Tibbetts,” Brown said. “There weren’t two other guys. That’s a figment of his imagination.”

  • WHAT IS DALTON JACK’S ALIBI?

    Rivera’s attorneys have tried to arouse questions about Tibbett’s boyfriend Dalton Jack.

    Jack, 23, now an Army sergeant stationed at Fort Bragg in North Carolina, admitted he cheated on Tibbetts once in the past. 

    “I was 19 years old, it was the beginning of our relationship, I screwed up one time. Mollie knew about it and we got past it,” Jack said under questioning during the trial.

    Police already scratched the idea of Jack being a suspect after establishing he had an alibi while working out of town on the day she was suspected of being killed.

    Mollie, who was studying psychology, was reportedly housesitting for Jack and his older brother Blake as they were out of town on separate construction jobs.

  • ATTORNEYS AROUSE QUESTIONS ABOUT MOLLIE’S BOYFRIEND

    Rivera’s attorneys have tried to arouse questions about Tibbett’s boyfriend Dalton Jack.

    Jack, 23, now an Army sergeant stationed at Fort Bragg in North Carolina, admitted he cheated on Tibbetts once in the past. 

    “I was 19 years old, it was the beginning of our relationship, I screwed up one time. Mollie knew about it and we got past it,” Jack said under questioning during the trial.

  • DOES RIVERA CLAIM TO KNOW THE MEN WHO FORCED HIM TO KILL JOGGER?

    During his shocking testimony inside a courtroom at the Scott County Courthouse in Davenport, Rivera explained how the monstrous pair ordered him into his car and to drive, according to the Associated Press

    While on the road, Rivera said the men spotted Tibbets jogging and he said they directed him to hit the brakes, the AP reported.

    After stopping, Rivera recalled how one of the men exited the car wielding a knife and headed down the rural road. 

    About 10 minutes elapsed before the second masked man lost his nerve waiting in the car and allegedly said, “Come on, Jack,” the accused said during the court hearing.

    Rivera claimed the two men were complete strangers.

  • WHAT SENTENCE DOES RIVERA FACE?

    The MAN on trial for the savage murder of Mollie Tibbetts testified that two armed men wearing masks forced him at gunpoint to aid in ending her life.

    Cristhian Bahena Rivera claimed two men wearing stocking caps showed up at his trailer home after he had finished showering and ordered him to drive them in his car.

    The 26-year-old Mexican national who came illegally to the US as a teen, was called by the defense to testify on his own behalf as he stands accused of murdering the University of Iowa student in 2018 and dumping her slashed body in a remote cornfield.

    If convicted, Rivera faces life in prison.

  • RIVERA CLAIMS TWO MEN FORCED HIM TO KILL JOGGER

    Cristhian Bahena Rivera claimed two men wearing stocking caps showed up at his trailer home after he had finished showering and ordered him to drive them in his car.

    During his shocking testimony inside a courtroom at the Scott County Courthouse in Davenport, Rivera explained how the monstrous pair ordered him into his car and to drive, according to the Associated Press

    While on the road, Rivera said the men spotted Tibbets jogging and he said they directed him to hit the brakes, the AP reported.

    After stopping, Rivera recalled how one of the men exited the car wielding a knife and headed down the rural road. 

    About 10 minutes elapsed before the second masked man lost his nerve waiting in the car and allegedly said, “Come on, Jack,” the accused said during the court hearing.

  • RIVERA SAID HE WAS NOT TRUTHFUL WHEN HE WAS QUESTIONED

    Bahena Rivera said he wasn’t truthful when detectives began questioning him about Tibbetts’ disappearance on August 20 2018 because he was worried about his daughter’s safety.

    Back then, he said he had approached Tibbetts as she ran, fought with her after she threatened to call police and then “blacked out” before hiding her body.

    He said he agreed to lead investigators to Tibbetts’ body early the next day because he was tired and wanted the interrogation to end.

    And he said police had urged him to “put myself in the family’s position and to think of” how he would feel if his daughter was missing.